COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION TIPS

HALLOWEEN SAFETY POINTERS FOR PARENTS

Halloween may be a fun holiday for kids, but for parents, trick-or-treat time can be a little tricky. Concerns about children's safety — whether they are out in the neighborhood or back home with bountiful bags of goodies — can darken the day more quickly than a black cat. But not to worry! Following a few Halloween safety tips will be a "howling" good time for all.

MAKE SURE YOUR KIDS DRESS UP SAFELY

  • Check that the costumes are flame-retardant so the little ones aren't in danger near burning jack-o- lanterns and other fire hazards.
  • Keep costumes short to prevent trips, falls and other bumps in the night.
  • Try make-up instead of a mask. Masks can be hot and uncomfortable and, more importantly, they can obstruct a child's vision — a dangerous thing when kids are crossing streets and going up and down steps.
  • Make sure kids wear light colors or put reflective tape on their costumes. Trick-or-treaters always should be in groups so they aren't a tempting target for real-life goblins. Parents should accompany young children.

MAKE TRICK-OR- TREATING TROUBLE FREE

  • Make sure older kids trick-or-treat with friends. Together, map out a safe route so parents know where they’ll be. Tell them to stop only at familiar homes where the outside lights are on.
  • Try to get your kids to trick-or-treat while it's still light out. If it's dark, make sure someone has a flashlight and pick well-lighted streets.
  • Make sure kids know not to enter strangers’ cars.
  • Kids need to know not to eat their treats until they get home. One way to keep trick-or-treaters from digging in while they're still out is to feed them a meal or substantial Snack beforehand.
  • Check out all treats at home in a well-lighted place.
  • What to eat? Only unopened candies and other treats that are in original wrappers. Don't Forget to inspect fruit and homemade goodies for anything suspicious. By all means, remind kids not to eat everything at once or they'll be feeling pretty ghoulish for awhile.

CONSIDER THIS

Parents and kids can avoid trick-or-treating troubles entirely by organizing a Halloween costume party with treats, games, contests, music, scary stories, and much more. Make your Halloween party the place to be! Schools, fire stations, libraries, or civic groups in many communities organize "haunted houses" and other festivities for families.

DRESSED UP AND DANGEROUS?

Halloween blood and gore are harmless stuff for the most part. But sometimes dressing up as a super hero, a scary monster, or an alien from outer space — coupled with the excitement of Halloween — brings out aggressive behavior. Even fake knives, swords, guns, and other costume accessories can hurt people. If these objects are part of a child's costume, make sure they are made from cardboard or other flexible materials. Better yet, challenge kids to create costumes that don't need "weapons" to be scary and fun.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Holiday Safety Tips

For many people, autumn events like Halloween and Harvest Day are fun times to dress up in costumes, go trick-or-treating, attend parties, and eat yummy treats. These events are also opportunities to provide nutritious snacks, get physical activity, and focus on safety.
Check out these tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for trick-or-treaters and party guests.

Going trick-or-treating?

  • Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible.
  • Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
  • Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.
  • Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.
  • Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others see you. Always WALK and don't run from house to house.
  • Always test make-up in a small area first. Remove it before bedtime to prevent possible skin and eye irritation.
  • Look both ways before crossing the street. Use established crosswalks wherever possible.
  • Lower your risk for serious eye injury by not wearing decorative contact lenses.
  • Only walk on sidewalks whenever possible, or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
  • Wear well-fitting masks, costumes, and shoes to avoid blocked vision, trips, and falls.
  • Eat only factory-wrapped treats. Avoid eating homemade treats made by strangers.
  • Enter homes only if you're with a trusted adult. Only visit well-lit houses. Don't stop at dark houses. Never accept rides from strangers.
  • Never walk near lit candles or luminaries. Be sure to wear flame-resistant costumes.

Expecting trick-or-treaters or party guests?

  • Provide healthier treats for trick-or-treaters such as low-calorie treats and drinks. For party guests, offer a variety of fruits, vegetables, and cheeses.
  • Use party games and trick-or-treat time as an opportunity for kids to get their daily dose of 60 minutes of physical activity.
  • Be sure walking areas and stairs are well-lit and free of obstacles that could result in falls.
  • Keep candle-lit jack o'lanterns and luminaries away from doorsteps, walkways, landings, and curtains. Place them on sturdy tables, keep them out of the reach of pets and small children, and never leave them unattended.
  • Remind drivers to watch out for trick-or-treaters and to drive safely.

If you have questions, please contact Lost Hills Sheriff Station (818) 878-1808

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